Home > Rug, Kelim, Soumak, Textile Post Archive >Another Anatolian Relative Appears: Part 1
Author:jc
email:
Sun, May 12th, 2013 09:21:44 AM
Topic: Another Anatolian Relative Appears: Part 1


ancient Anatolian carpet fragment with pre-archetypal Turkmen Gol, published RugKazbah.com in "An Ancient Saryk Main Carpet and its Progenitor”

Last year RK published a multi-part paper titled “An Ancient Saryk Main Carpet and its Progenitor” concerning the seemingly strong relationship between the Saryk Timurchin gol on an archetype example in our collection and an ancient, far earlier, pile carpet fragment(above) made presumably in eastern Anatolia by an unknown weaving group that, apparently, had migrated from Turkmenistan.

Here is the link* to Part One:
*please note RugKazbah.com does not support active links, you must cut and paste the link below into your browser window to activate them

http://rugkazbah.com/boards/records.php?id=2016&refnum=2016

The other parts can be found here at the bottom of this page:

http://rugkazbah.com/boards/posts.php?topicno=5

Quite sometime later another fragment, obviously very related but substantially later appeared.

RK published it and some commentary, entitled “A Far Younger Relative Appears” here:

http://rugkazbah.com/boards/records.php?id=2325&refnum=2325

Now a third companion example has appeared

Central Anatolian fragment recently offered for sale on the internet

This fragment is quite a bit earlier than the younger relative but far substantially later than the one we published in the progenitor discussion.

Here are two side-by-side comparison that clearly show this fact.


Above left the youngest example; Above right: a quite earlier example; Below left that quite earlier example; Below right: the substantially earlier example

Comparisons like this are few and far between.

The main reason being there are so few really ancient Anatolian Village weavings extant to show the archetype form most commonly seen carpets were modeled after.

Were there RK is sure not only would there be more, but understanding the mechanics of design reproduction and transference both within the Anatolian Village and clan weaving traditions themselves and those of the Ottoman Court would be far more known.

Alas, they aren’t so let’s run with the ball here a bit while this one is in focus.

It seems blatantly obvious to us these three fragments are closely related and most probably (we think definitely) made by the same weaving group.

Why then do they exhibit such clear differences?

1. They were made at different times, and those times are not just a generation or two but far more widely spaced.

We would guess the youngest is circa 1800, the next circa 1700 and the third circa 1300. Someday, perhaps, some others will appear to fill this last far larger gap

2. They were made in different geographic locations in Anatolia. The earliest being produced in north-central eastern Anatolia (Erzurum?); the next chronologically in east-central Anatolia (somewhere between Sivas and Malatya?); and the third far more western Anatolia (somewhere between Afyon and Ushak?).

The fact large tribal movements, forced both by man and nature, happened over long centuries in Anatolia is firmly established. So the distinct possibility this weaving group, and untold others, was able to remain faithful to its weaving culture and proprietary traditions is not something easily dismissed.

Plus the influx of migrating Turkmen tribal groups into Anatolia is equally as established a fact.

Few specific details of these migrations are known, making further identifications nothing but guesswork and supposition.

We wish we had more to add to this comparison but as we don’t and feel further speculation will add nothing we will leave this exercise as it now stands.

We do suggest motivated readers spend some time comparing the three fragments, particularly the two earlier ones.

Since we dislike actual dating, preferring to use our Archaic/Classic/Traditional/Industrial Period schema, let’s “date” them with it.

As we have previously written the oldest is Archaic Period, the next late Classic Period and the third mid-Traditional period.

Should any reader know of any related example RK would enjoy hearing from you.

Author: jc
email:
Sun, May 12th, 2013 09:21:44 AM

For convenience we are republishing below the original paper where we introduced the ancient Anatolian fragment and discussed its remarkable relationship with a Timurchin gol Saryk main carpet we believe is the earliest known.

Below are four pictures, two from our archaic Saryk Timurchin gol main carpet(MC) and two from the fragment we mentioned in Part I (of "What does RK know about Turkmen rugs").

We will explain this soon but decided prior to that to post just the pictures to allow those brighter and more astute readers to try and figure out where this comparison is going.


archaic Timurchin gol from our Saryk MC


detail ..........


archaic 'memling' gol from our Saryk MC


detail ........

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