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Author:webmaster
email:
Thu, Aug 3rd, 2006 03:03:50 PM
Topic: John Taylor's Photo

This is the Trinitarias Carpet, from the Cloister of the same name in Madrid.

It is said to have been a gift from Philip IV, and is first mentioned in 1699. It was sold in the twenties and is now supposed to be in the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.

Mary Hammond Sullivan, from the Winterthur Museum, gave a lecture about it to the Princeton Rug Society in 1988.

The illustration is from Stanley Reed`s book on oriental rugs, which is a rather under-rated work pitched at the novice but which also contains a repro of the Perez collection Ardebil fragment and an interesting Salting group rug.

Maybe someone knows where this rug has been published in colour?

Author: azura
email: azuranewman@yahoo.com
Thu, Aug 3rd, 2006 03:03:50 PM

RK Replies:

Many thanks for pointing out the typo.

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I noticed the following parragraph today

"However, the chicken-and-the-egg corrundrum this raises is not so simple as that. No doubt the designers of these Classical Carpets were privvy to patterns, designs and icons used by earlier generations of weavers."

Corrundrum is a gemstone (sapphire or ruby depending on the inpurities present).

The word you want is connundrum

Author: JT
email: John Taylor
Wed, Dec 31st, 2003 03:37:02 AM

Here is a similar carpet to the Trinitarias.

It`s from Pope, pl.1155.

Erdmann later pulled this in for his disastrous survey of the Salting carpets.

The piece is now in the Musee des Arts Decoratifs, in Paris.

The Trinitarias example looks more affable with its white ground border and less busy style.

James Templeton and Co. were a famous firm of carpetmakers who owned the Trinitarias before it went to Australia, and here`s what they made of it for the Presidential Palace of the Dominican Republic.

Author: jc
email: jakc@rugkazbah.com
Sun, Dec 28th, 2003 02:30:46 PM

It's definitely an interesting specimen, notice the flame-like palmettes in the field. These sure appear to be the archetypes of those which appear in that rare group of Kurdish rugs, where similar ones can be seen.

Also another palmette that appears there, those ragged edged ones with a floral motif inside sure look like archetypes for those found in many NW Persian/ Caucasian long rugs as well.

The symbiotic relationship between Classical Persian Carpets, like this one, and many of the somewhat later rugs made in NW Persia/Caucasus and those we now call "Kurdish" surely needs to be further explored.

However, the chicken-and-the-egg corrundrum this raises is not so simple as that. No doubt the designers of these Classical Carpets were privvy to patterns, designs and icons used by earlier generations of weavers.

The entire question of Timurid carpet weaving and the lack of any known examples is another perplexing subject that just lately seems to becoming investigated and might yield some insights into the derivations of the designs found on a carpet like this one.

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